Tag Archives: Writing process

Working with an e-Publisher – Update

PerWorking with an e-Publisher – Update

In my last post I related two points of information; the first explained that the publishing process had reached the stage of approved block designs for the cover and book interior including a completed index, and the second related to a small tense issue in the cover text.

I sent a note to my PSA (Publishing Support Associate), the title of the individual who guides me through the final part of the publishing process. In the note I explained my concern. His response explained the context in which the tense was chosen, which made perfect sense. If you consider the tense relationships in the cover text as a unique piece of writing, then inconsistencies in tense seem like a glaring error. However, the cover text is written in reference to the completed book and to the actions of the author in writing it. Thus, the past tense in amongst words implying the present make sense, since the acts related to writing are in the past.

As I reflect back on the whole experience if writing a few key ideas stand out in my mind.

1. Completing a lengthy writing project is more work than one can imagine.

2. The sense of accomplishment on completion of the project is greater than expected.

3. The final product cannot be achieved without the support of many professionals unless one is thoroughly versed in every phase of the process.

4. The writing process presents the writer with moments of exhilaration, frustration, satisfaction, and dismay. The remarkable thing about all these feelings is that there is nothing unpleasant about them.

5. If one is not prepared to be disciplined, self-critical, persistent, and determined to complete your writing project writing is not the best way to spend your time.

The next step in the process is to review the printer’s proof. When it arrives by courier, I will see the finished product for the first time. My next post in this series will follow shortly after the proof copy is in my hands. The feeling of excitement that comes with this stage of the process is irrepressible. The plan is to luxuriate in the moment.

Until my next post, as always your faithful blogger,

L Alan Weiss – Author of Through a Lens of Emptiness: Reflections on Life, Longevity, and Contentment.

Visit my author website at www.lalanweiss.com

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Now the pace quickens

In my last blog post I reported on completing the changes to the third edit version of my manuscript. Believe it or not, I listened and read the manuscript one last time before submitting it for the next stage of the process, the editorial review board. This is important, because this is the group that decides if the book merits their seal of approval. I’m feeling pretty good about the project at the moment.

This last review, reading along with the text-to-voice app generated a few minor changes to improve the flow of language. The advantage of doing so many reviews of the work arises from a familiarity with the text that cannot be achieved in any other way. Now, small glitches in rhythm, language flow and word choice stand out from the now familiar background of the text. This review process takes about six hours to complete when the text is read back at 180 words a minute for a 66000 word manuscript.

The next task is to set up my files for transfer to the person who sets the book into its final form. I will also be working with someone to set up the book cover. As usual, I’m relying on the people the publisher employs to do this. It seems that I can expect to see a completed book ready for release in two to three months.

I had a long conversation with a representative of the publisher re: planning for marketing my book. You cannot sell books without marketing them. Marketing involves a range of activity from developing a web presence, to press releases and possible speaking engagements. It takes an effort to sell a book when the author has no public profile. Ken Follett might sell many copies of an average book just because he is Ken Follett. An unknown author may only sell a few copies of a great book without recognition.

My next adventure is to develop a marketing plan. I’ll keep you up to date as this and other processes unfold

Until the next post

Larry (L Alan Weiss), soon to be author of. . .

Through a Lens of Emptiness

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Yin and Yang Cycle – A useful tool

It has been nearly one week since I posted thanks to a mire of major and minor technical problems. The Yin of Windows 8 is excellent. The Yang of it sometimes causes problems. It is 4:15 AM and I have finally re-established contact with the Internet.

This post is about how to apply a Yin/Yang cycle to enhance the writing process. Essentially the idea is to let the Yang (expansive, creative, and sometimes less than substantial) dominate the process for a while, then let the Yin (focused, well edited, and substantial) take over before the essence of an idea is lost or gets off track.

I have been applying this practice to my own writing and it works well with one caveat. Just before the creative burst gets out of hand and the editing process begins, make a brief note of where the thought was going. I found that sometimes it was difficult to restart a line of thought without some form of prompt. The editing process is cold and unfeeling, requiring the objective application of the rules of grammar and a critical focus on word choice, can have a dampening effect on the heat of the creative process.

Generating a prompt to assist to support generative process requires one to ask two critical questions; the first relates to the material to be edited and the second relates to the relevance of the next generative burst. The principal idea that dominates this process is relevance, which demands what has been generated remains relevant to theme of the overall piece and at the same time is relevant to the target audience. Given that the test of relevance has been passed, the written lines must pass the test of completeness of thought. When the Yang of the process is complete another Yin phase can begin. This cyclic, iterative process continues to role along like a rolling Yin/Yang symbol. process
So far, this approach to writing has been keeping the end product tightly written and strongly creative.

Until next time . . .

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The Yin and Yang of Writing

This entry comes from off the coast of Italy on what is actually a dark and stormy night. I’m posting this entry using a BlackBerry Z10 so the editing is a bit tricky. I’ll do my best.

I’ve been thinking about the nature of the writing process in terms of Yin and Yang.

The Yang of writing is the fun part of the process. It’s the creative, generative, searching for substance part of the act of writing that places demands on writer. It’s the out there, upfront energy that emerges from inspiration. It is the Yang element that results in the first draft.

The Yin of the process is that of editing. The writer take his or her draft from a stage of a work of a less substantial form to one that is more dense with greater substance. By carefully shaping the syntax, grammar and word choice the work takes on a more substanti
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Going From Writer to Published Author?

My Dome of Heaven includes dreams and challenges. Writing has always been a challenge for me since I am a moderate dyslexic. Writing a book has always been a dream achievement. Becoming an author, a published writer, is the ultimate extension of that dream.

About one year ago I decided to get on with the challenge and began the process of researching and writing a book. 50,000 words and eleven months later, a manuscript exists. Thanks to the kindness of former colleagues, my most glaring of inadequacies in grammar and word choice have been corrected, but much remains to be done. In order to move the manuscript toward publication I will some begin working through the process of developing the manuscript into a published book. I intend to write about the process.

I will share the experience of working with a development editor, reporting on the process, my reactions and feelings as I respond to suggestions by the editors, and the progress made toward the final product. I intend to respond positively to all suggestions with energy and let the various editors do their job. I hope to learn a great deal by working on my manuscript with these individuals. The costs incurred serve a two-fold purpose; the first is to achieve a publishable book, and the second is to learn enough about the writing process so that I may continue writing books. I hope this will be a useful exercise for others who are struggling with the writing process as well.

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