Tag Archives: self publishing

Marketing a Book #10 – Promoting Your Book and Yourself

20150523_162505 (2)Book Facts and Fantasy

I haven’t posted to this blog for a while. Since my last post there have been a few experiences related to book marketing worth writing about. The first relates to book signing opportunities and the second to direct to the public marketing at a market type event.

An author signing sounds like a terrific opportunity at first for the novice writer with his first book in print. In my case, the book is a creative non-fiction work. The opportunity was provided by Indigo/Chapters in Canada. I won’t name the bookstore branch since it is irrelevant to what I have to say. The store and the manager were most accommodating and welcoming, so that is not an issue. The issue is the reality of the bookstore as a venue.

I believe I stated in a long ago post that the idea of writing a book was daunting for two reasons; the enormity of the task, and the massive number of books available for the buying public to choose from. It was clear from the beginning that I would be fighting for oxygen the whole way. Not only are there vast numbers of books in print but there is an even larger ocean of eBooks in this world. All of those books are competing for the reader’s dollars before you put pen to paper.

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Book signing display

When you have a book signing scheduled many factors influence the possibility of making a sale, particularly when you are essentially an unknown quantity. So the first reality is no name, no fame, and no line up of people wanting to talk to you or look at your book. I did sell one copy to an interested reader, and had a few good conversations with a few individuals, but that was the sum total of the action during two four-hour intervals on different days. Perhaps the writer of a niche non-fiction work should be pleased with that outcome, but I’m a novice at this, so that’s just a guess.

The people who visit a bookstore usually have a book, or specific author in mind. This chain of bookstores is big on quality, unique, non-literature gift items as well, which is a big draw. The gift buyers are not there for books at all. There is also a Starbucks on site, so there are some people who pop in for a copy of a magazine or a newspaper and a coffee. Even on a great store traffic day, the probability of having people come over to your table is very small. You might as well be “the Invisible Man.” In fact, if I were an invisible man who had written a book, it probably would attract some attention. I was just INVISIBLE.

The other thing to consider is the “Consignment split”, which can be as little as 30% to the store. Stores in this chain take 45% of a sale. That’s not a problem, it’s just the cost of having space made available for your event. I suggest taking advantage of an opportunity to have an in-store event. You might get some leads and make some contacts with the public.

Direct sales are the best way to earn some money from your book. Copies can be ordered from the publisher at a significant discount. The Canada/US Dollar exchange rate was much better when I bought my copies. With the current exchange rates, the cost to the author increases. If I sell a book for the $CDN equivalent, the cost would be close to $30 a copy. I have been selling my books as if the $CDN is on par with the $US. Since my copies were purchased at about $13.22 CDN a copy, my profit is $8.78 a copy, so 10 copies net me $87.80. At the current exchange rate, my net gain would be about $1.00 less per copy or $77.80 net.

I decided to try direct sales to the public at a Christmas Market held at a popular location during the last weekend of November. The cost of a 2.5 x 4 sq ft display space on a covered table top was $220.00 + Taxes, $245.00 total. I needed gross sales from 11 books to break even. I sold only 8. That’s the downside of my experience. The upside was the number of public interactions I had over those two days. Not only did I make some important contacts through those interactions, but I was also able to affirm the validity of my plan to offer guided autobiography/memoir writing workshops at different venues in the coming year.

Book display for November show.

Book display for November show.

The number of books one might sell at a venue is limited by two factors; the audience for the sale and the cost of admission to the venue. This Christmas Market was held at a Botanical Garden and the emphasis was on Christmas displays, a model train display, and a ride on a miniature railway through a lighted garden. Most of the people attending were families with small children who had already paid an admission fee to enter the gardens. Definitely not my target audience.

There were some older individuals that were members of the gardens and entered the site free of charge. They were few in number, but accounted for almost all my sales and for most of the interactions providing good leads. I was also able to get my business cards distributed to a wider audience. I have already booked sales tables at two additional shows for 2016, but this time my target audience is assured. The shows are for seniors titled Forever Young. In addition to the sales space, I was able to pay a small fee to guarantee a corner table spot and reserve a 20-minute slot to make a presentation. There will be between 1400 and 1600 senior citizens in attendance at each show, which are 100% within my target group.

Just one more thing… You are going to have to spend a bit of money to reserve these sales locations so choose the event wisely.

As always, your faithful blogger,

L Alan Weiss (Larry) – Author

www.lalanweiss.com and www.lensofemptiness.com , and perhaps like my fan page at www.facebook.com/lalanweiss

publishing, signkng,

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Marketing Services – Books Don’t Sell Themselves

Marketing Your BookBuying Marketing Services – Books Don’t Sell Themselves

The publisher, iUniverse, has published my book. They provided all the editorial and production service covered by my publishing agreement with them and they have been most satisfactory. I have blogged regularly, posting progress reports and reflections on the processes involved as they unfolded. Now books need to be sold in a highly competitive market. An audience for Through a Lens of Emptiness is out there for sure, but the target audience for a book is both ephemeral and elusive unless an author can reach out to it. This is a daunting task for a début author, so all the support he can get in this endeavour is welcome. Unless he is particularly well connected with individuals that know the ropes, purchasing useful services are essential.

I’ve tried to build a bit of a following on my own over the last two years through blogging and the twitter-sphere. I’ll discuss that experience in the next blog post. I provide the following reflections with an understanding that which supports an author purchases are determined by $$$ available and not the desire to purchase quality services. Please note, I never name the support services purchased nor the prices paid in that everyone’s choice in services and service level will vary. The only service I will name is Google Ads, since everyone who uses the Internet knows what they are and who supplies them already.

I was informed about marketing services available to me through a marketing representative from iUniverse. These services were carefully explained to me, all my questions were answered in full, and there was no pressure or push to purchase any of them. I had time to think over the possible offerings and made my choices in my own time. The information available on the publisher’s web site provides some information about what is on offer, but direct contact with a knowledgeable individual was essential.

Google Ads looked like the best bang for the buck. This service allows me to define my target audience by age, interest, la gauge, and geographic region. The initial agreement for these ads covers the first three months of marketing. This means that for three months, informing my target audience that Through a Lens of Emptiness is available for purchase will be assured because of SEO (Search Engine Optimization).

The second service selected purchases the services of an professional author publicity services to help me create a social media presence. This service is the more expensive of the two, but it is a pragmatic way of filling a big gap in my knowledge and experience. I have been finding my way through the nuance of using blogging and twitter to build an audience and establish a profile, but I still am wondering in the wilderness. Using Facebook to create an author well developed author page remains obscure. I look forward to the support I will receive and the knowledge to be gained from the experience.

The marketing ball is rolling and should gain momentum after I submit the extensive questionnaires that provide the necessary information for these service to move my marketing process along to the next stage.

In my next post I’ll reflect on my experiences with twitter and blogging.

Until my next post, as always your faithful blogger,

L Alan Weiss (Larry) – Author of Through a Lens of Emptiness , now available through Google Books, Amazon.com, and the iUniverse Book Store.

Visit my author website at www.lalanweiss.com

Are professional marketing services actually necessary? Do you use an Twitter based Marketing services? Please comment……..

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Working with an e-Publisher – Live at Last, live at last, my book is live at last

Working with an ePublisher – Live at Last

This blog strand focused on experiences and thoughts related to self-publishing and working with a specific publishing service provider. Those who have been following these posts know that until now, the ePublisher is never identified. Five days ago the book went live, which means that it is available for purchase either as an eBook or as a print on demand copy. The publisher can be identified now that the writing and production phase of my self-publishing project is completed. IUniverse provided the services and supports that enabled me to complete the project and bring Through a Lens of Emptiness: Reflections on Life, Longevity, and Contentment into being.

Of course, there are a number of companies that provide services to the self-publishing author. Each offers packages with various services included; the more services provided the greater the cost. The question for the would-be author is what level of service he requires to supplement the level of expertise he brings to the table. If the aspiring author is a novice in the writing and publishing field, then the more support one purchases the better. In my case, the package selected was the full meal deal.

I am not shilling for iUniverse in any way. Their services were selected based on the best information available from the iUniverse web site and from self-publishing forums. Some of the forum comments reflected less than satisfactory experiences, but squeaky wheels make the most noise, so I took them for what they said and nothing more. If you have been following this blog strand, the reader will know that my experience has been essentially positive from the beginning of my association with iUniverse in April 2012. I was determined to make the process work for me from the outset, take the advice given and act on it, and put in the sweat equity required to produce a publishable work. When the process began this a newly published author hadn’t a clue what was involved in terms of time and energy, but over time I discovered the magnitude of commitment required.

IUniverse provided contacts to support me from the very beginning of our relationship. In the beginning there were opportunities to discuss some of my ideas with individuals that were likely part of the marketing and sales staff. Their principle role seemed to revolve around informing me about additional services I might be interested in purchasing, but they were also willing to engage in extended conversations. When working with a company offering self-publishing services don’t be offended by these efforts at further monetizing the services on offer, after all that’s part of the business. No one ever twisted my arm to purchase any extra services. Listen carefully to what is on offer, one of those services might just be your cup of tea. The fact is, that in their efforts to interest you in other services you have a chance to discuss your ideas with a complete stranger, which is as useful as having conversations with people you know. Perhaps such conversations are even more useful than one might think, because whoever your target audience is, they are strangers too.

If a complete editing package is purchased, your work will be reviewed by editorial staff three times. My manuscript was reviewed by a developmental editor, a content editor, and a quality editor. The most useful editorial service was the DE (developmental edit). That’s when the author learns just how much work they still need to do. My own manuscript was full of faults, all of which were described in detail in an earlier post in this blog strand. If you are fortunate to have a good developmental editor go over your manuscript, make sure you read all their comments in detail. Those individual comments were essential in determining the scope and range of work required to get the writing process on track. In my case, the first draft required radical surgery, restructuring, and rewriting.

The other edits provided opportunity for further refinements, but by the second draft (66000 words of it), the final product had taken on its essential shape. In addition to editorial support, specialists in marketing, book production, and publicity were also on call to assist me in various stages of the process. If you do the research, and total the cost of all the services included in the most complete package iUniverse offers, an author attempting to locate and purchase a similar set of services on their own will spend at least as much money, if not more.

The other advantage to working with a company like iUniverse, or any of the other companies who offers services like these, is the sense of structure within one must work. Each specific phase of the process allows the author to target their energies, and focus on what needs to be done at any particular stage of the process. I still need to review the printer’s copy for defects in workmen ship, but the files submitted to me for approval suggest that the finished book will exceed my expectations. The same can be said for all the marketing materials, book launch materials, and an author web site that were included in the publishing package purchased.

My next blog post in this strand will reflect my reaction to the Printer’s proof copy and the actual materials included as marketing materials and book launch materials. So far, I can say with confidence, that every dollar spent has been worthwhile. This blog strand will continue as I work through the experience of marketing a book. When my author web site goes live, I’ll provide the link, but that will take about a week.

Until then, your faithful blogger,

L Alan Weiss – Author of Through a Lens of Emptiness, Reflections on Life, Longevity and Contentment which is now available through the iUniverse book store and Amazon.

Nota bene: The book will also be available through other supply channels as they come on stream. Some information still needs to be uploaded to these book stores including a book cover image and brief excerpt. Apparently it takes several days for a listing to take on its complete form. Thanks for understanding.

Visit my author website at www.lalanweiss.com

What was your reaction when your book went live? Comment below if you wish…

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Working with an e-Publisher – Update

PerWorking with an e-Publisher – Update

In my last post I related two points of information; the first explained that the publishing process had reached the stage of approved block designs for the cover and book interior including a completed index, and the second related to a small tense issue in the cover text.

I sent a note to my PSA (Publishing Support Associate), the title of the individual who guides me through the final part of the publishing process. In the note I explained my concern. His response explained the context in which the tense was chosen, which made perfect sense. If you consider the tense relationships in the cover text as a unique piece of writing, then inconsistencies in tense seem like a glaring error. However, the cover text is written in reference to the completed book and to the actions of the author in writing it. Thus, the past tense in amongst words implying the present make sense, since the acts related to writing are in the past.

As I reflect back on the whole experience if writing a few key ideas stand out in my mind.

1. Completing a lengthy writing project is more work than one can imagine.

2. The sense of accomplishment on completion of the project is greater than expected.

3. The final product cannot be achieved without the support of many professionals unless one is thoroughly versed in every phase of the process.

4. The writing process presents the writer with moments of exhilaration, frustration, satisfaction, and dismay. The remarkable thing about all these feelings is that there is nothing unpleasant about them.

5. If one is not prepared to be disciplined, self-critical, persistent, and determined to complete your writing project writing is not the best way to spend your time.

The next step in the process is to review the printer’s proof. When it arrives by courier, I will see the finished product for the first time. My next post in this series will follow shortly after the proof copy is in my hands. The feeling of excitement that comes with this stage of the process is irrepressible. The plan is to luxuriate in the moment.

Until my next post, as always your faithful blogger,

L Alan Weiss – Author of Through a Lens of Emptiness: Reflections on Life, Longevity, and Contentment.

Visit my author website at www.lalanweiss.com

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Awaiting the Index, a Worthwhile Wait

 

Awaiting the Index, a Worthwhile Wait

My manuscript has been turned into a book. The work Through a Lens of Emptiness: Reflections on Life, Longevity, and Contentment, is nearing its publication date. The text is in the hands of a professional who specializes in indexing. I expect to receive the index for my inspection and approval in a few more weeks. The topic of this post relate some thoughts on the value of specialized services.

Self-publishing is not an inexpensive undertaking. The package I purchased provided many editorial and support services, but not the type that result in a polished finished product. Proof Reading the final blocked out interior text and cover text is essential. No matter how excellent one’s technical writing skills may be, and no matter how exhaustive the author has been in proofing his or her work, a professional proof reader is worth the cost. This service was available to me at about $1000. You might find this a steep price to pay, but my brother paid almost twice that to proof edit his crime fiction novel, which has many fewer words than the 66000-word piece I have produced. No matter whether one uses the service provided by an e-publisher or hires an independent proof reader, there is a cost to producing a text free of errors.

If the work is a fiction, then indexing is not an issue, but if it is non-fiction, even creative non-fiction, indexing is necessary. Just examine any work of non-fiction, and an index should be present in the majority of those texts. The indexer will read my text and create an index that reflects the intent of my work. I will have a chance to review his work, but based on all the other supports I have received, I expect the index will be well done. My cost for indexing is close to $800. Again my reader may be shocked, but the expense is well worth it. The task of indexing is both tedious and highly specialized.

The added cost of specialized services is well worth it. I am confident that the final product will compare favourably with other industry standard books. Whether my book has public appeal or not is a moot point. The potential sales of an unknown author’s first book are a statistic that time will reveal. That will also depend on how the book is marketed and what exposure it gets. Marketing my book is the next exciting adventure that awaits me..

My work is a creative non-fiction. The factor that makes it easier to market non-fiction is that the target audience for my words and ideas exists. Reaching that target audience is the trick. I’m working on that problem as I await the official release of my book. Of course, I will be blogging on that experience as well. My plan is to dedicate myself to marketing my book over the next year. It will be yet another interesting experience in the life of the first-time author. I must admit; there were times when I thought that the sobriquet AUTHOR would never apply to me.

Until the next post, as always your faithful blogger,

L Alan Weiss (Larry) – Author of Through a Lens of Emptiness: Reflections on Life, Longevity and Contentment

Do you think that all non-fiction genera books require an index? Please comment…..

Visit my author website at www.lalanweiss.com

 


 

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Working with an E-Publisher The Final Steps #1

Working with an E-Publisher – The Final Steps #1

This is the next in the series of blog posts related to working with an E-Publisher. The process has reached the production and printing stage after thirty-one months. The final stages revolve around entering the proof reading changes, reviewing the block design proofs for the cover and inside of the book, reviewing and accepting the proof reader’s changes, another review of the text and cover to make sure everything is correct, accepting the final cover and inside designs, indexing, reviewing and approving the index, and final review of the Galley Proof for problems. I am required to accept and sign off on each step.

The ‘quality edit’, which was performed on the last version of the manuscript was submitted after corrections were made, along with a corrected version of the text that would be printed on the back of the book. This is the version that was submitted for layout to fit the 6×9 format plan for the finished book. Once formatted, the block design proofs were reviewed by a proof reader. The book cover was also designed and my suggested text was polished. Once complete, the inside block design proof, proof reader’s corrections, and cover design were sent back in PDF format.

When the PDF files with the block designs for the inside matter and the cover were received, I also received a list of the proof reader’s findings and had to review and accept each suggested change. Each change was listed on a form which was indexed by the page number, the paragraph number, the sentence number, along with the suggested correction and a reason for the change. That file, along with the accepted changes were sent back to the publisher, the changes were made, and the PDF files were sent back for my review. Any changes that I felt still needed to be made were entered on a form in the same manner as the proof reader had provided.

I received the PDF files of the cover and inside matter once again. This time, I needed to verify that the final changes I wished to be made, had been made correctly. Once again, I needed to state explicitly that the changes had been made as requested. Following that acceptance e-mail, and before the process of set up and printing could move forward, I officially signed off on the block designs. The publisher can get on with the remainder of the process now that my approvals are official.

I’ll describe the remainder of my experiences as my project moves toward the final published work. However, before this post concludes, there are a few important reminders.

· The publisher provides support all along the way, but the author bears responsibility for the quality of the final product.

· The amount of support from the publisher depends on the publishing package you purchase. Make sure you know what services to expect based on the package purchased.

· Make sure you review your manuscript carefully at each step of the process. If you are less than diligent in your review, costly and embarrassing mistakes are inevitable.

· Use the best writing support available. These include a top quality word processor and a quality grammar checking service. I used Word 2013, Grammarly (available at www.grammarly.com ), and also a high quality text-to-voice software package. As stated in an earlier post, the text-to-voice software allows the author to step back from his work and be objectively critical, listen to the rhythm of the language, and listen for the clarity of meaning in the language written for others to read.

· Always save backup copies of your work.

Until the next post, your faithful blogger, L Alan Weiss (Larry) – Author of Through a Lens of Emptiness.

www.lensofemptiness.com Release date TBA

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finally . . the submission

The final stages of the approval process have been completed, including the marketing text for the cover.  All the edits have been approved and the marketing text has passed muster. The only stages of the process remaining include a properly structure final submission, approval of a cover design, the scrutiny of a proof reader, professional indexing and final approval of the finished book.  In order to submit the manuscript for layout in book form (eBook and print format), it must be packaged properly.

A manuscript is composed on pages that are 8.5 x 11 inches, but a book is published in various formats. The print version of my book will be 6 x 9 inches. To complicate matters further, the margins of a manuscript are not the margin dimensions of a finished book. The individual charged with formatting a book for publication requires some freedom to prepare the book layout. My submission will consist of  two folders; one folder contains a single clean copy of the manuscript and a second folder which contains a separate file for each graphic or photograph to be included in the text.  All photographs and graphics, should their be any, are cut from the manuscript and a place holder is inserted to indicate where each belongs.

My manuscript also includes some tables and text boxes. I was given the option of formatting them myself or having it done by the layout pro. I have opted to have them formatted for placement by the layout pro because I am certain to make a hash of it. After all the work and expense of getting to this point,  a highly professional looking finished product is the only possible outcome for the author.

The cover design is another matter which I have turned over to the pros. They will do their best to come up with a cover design that is attractive and appealing, and I simply have to approve it. Throughout this process I have taken my lead from the experts. I am a writer, not a layout expert. When you choose to self publish and pay for a package deal, the expertise of the publisher is what you paid for so you should exploit it to the max. Tomorrow, when I click the send button on an email that has my files attached in submission format, I do so with confidence and certainly a degree of excitement.

The next phase of the process is up to me. There are lots of books for people to chose from in this world and no book sells itself. Unless you already have a public profile of some note, the first time author is an unknown entity in a very crowded and competitive space.  I have written for a target audience and I need to reach out to them. My next post will discuss marketing planning and structuring an Author platform.

Until the next post I remain your faithful blogger . . .

L Alan Weiss (Larry) 

Soon to be published author of Through a Lens of Emptiness

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Now the pace quickens

In my last blog post I reported on completing the changes to the third edit version of my manuscript. Believe it or not, I listened and read the manuscript one last time before submitting it for the next stage of the process, the editorial review board. This is important, because this is the group that decides if the book merits their seal of approval. I’m feeling pretty good about the project at the moment.

This last review, reading along with the text-to-voice app generated a few minor changes to improve the flow of language. The advantage of doing so many reviews of the work arises from a familiarity with the text that cannot be achieved in any other way. Now, small glitches in rhythm, language flow and word choice stand out from the now familiar background of the text. This review process takes about six hours to complete when the text is read back at 180 words a minute for a 66000 word manuscript.

The next task is to set up my files for transfer to the person who sets the book into its final form. I will also be working with someone to set up the book cover. As usual, I’m relying on the people the publisher employs to do this. It seems that I can expect to see a completed book ready for release in two to three months.

I had a long conversation with a representative of the publisher re: planning for marketing my book. You cannot sell books without marketing them. Marketing involves a range of activity from developing a web presence, to press releases and possible speaking engagements. It takes an effort to sell a book when the author has no public profile. Ken Follett might sell many copies of an average book just because he is Ken Follett. An unknown author may only sell a few copies of a great book without recognition.

My next adventure is to develop a marketing plan. I’ll keep you up to date as this and other processes unfold

Until the next post

Larry (L Alan Weiss), soon to be author of. . .

Through a Lens of Emptiness

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Working with an e-publisher continued

It has been an age since I posted, and I can tell you it has everything to do with working up a manuscript. The focus required to complete the tasks related to producing a manuscript for publication preclude spending time writing anything else; not tweets, not blog posts, not even emails.

The content edit (a line by line edit which edits grammar, form and structure) was returned to me a few weeks ago while on vacation in Europe, so it just had to wait until I returned to address it. The only bits remaining for revision were some insertions and corrections that only the author can write or make decisions about. The editorial group at the publisher are excellent at responding to my questions and providing clear guidance as needed in this phase of the editing process. The soon to be completed revisions will then to be shipped back  to the editorial staff for one last look-see, re: the changes that have been introduced recently.

I have continued to follow the guidance of the editor, subverting any ego that might interfere with the process. In fact, if the author still has an ego remaining after the editorial process, then they have a problem.  By now, one’s ego should have been replaced with enhanced self esteem as his work has become more and more refined through the process.

One must  remain circumspect and objective as he continues to work through the editing process. I, once again, highly recommend using a first rate text to voice translator so that you can listen to your own words. Your work becomes like a talking book and you can distance yourself sufficiently in order to remain objective.

I have enjoyed this little foray back into the world of blogging and have a series of ideas to present based on observations made during my recent Grand Tour of parts of Western Europe.

Until next post…. DSCN0568 Carnac 2014-08-06

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Some Simple Truths – Caught Between a $ and a Hard Choice

The only certain way to self-publish with a minimum of expense is to be an expert in all areas of editing and marketing. The novice writer, who is also a newbie to the world of self-publishing, most likely thinks of copy editing as the only editing required to achieve a publishable work. The budding author who has an excellent grasp of English grammar believes he or she has the editing tiger by the tail and is sure to produce the perfect manuscript. To be sure, a copy-edit (line by line edit) is essential, but as an individuals experience of working with a self-publishing house grows, editing requirements take on new dimensions of complexity. Consider the following sequence . . .

* A writer drafts a manuscript and submits it to the publisher. (N.B. the writer has purchased some level of publishing package from the self-publishing house prior to submitting a manuscript)

* The manuscript is reviewed and  feedback provided – at this point the publisher may say the work is not acceptable for publishing, but will most likely refer your project to a development consultant.

* After a conversation (or conversations) with the consultant, various services are offered at a per/word cost, which one is free to decline – at this point the writer can either work up the manuscript based on the commentary of the preliminary review and submit the revised manuscript for review at a cost – or – elect to go with one of the many editing/author support services offered.

* The hopeful author needs to be prepared for other consultants, offering support and services, to call. A call from a marketing consultant is a certainty.

There are two simple truths for those who become engaged with a self publisher: first, the more types of editing and the more self-promotion a writer can do, the less it will cost to publish a book – second, some of the services offered have value and merit, so the writer might pick and chose which are worth the investment in $$$ required to take advantage the service/s offered.

Think about the section found at the beginning of most books (or sometimes at the end), the acknowledgements. When the author thanks the editors provided by the publisher and all the individuals who provided other supports for the creative process that resulted in a book, they are thanking a host of formal and informal editors and reviewers. Those individuals, who may be few or many, provided development edits, substantive edits, content edits, quality edits, copy edits and feedback on the writing itself. The difference between the established author and the self-published author is who pays for all that support. Money and financial backing flows to the established author before, during, and after his or her book is published. Some money (dreamed of royalties) may flow to the self-published author after a book hits the market, but the financial backing of that book is the responsibility of the writer.

The jury is out on the self-publishing process. More evidence is required to make a judgement about this process. Reading the comments and critiques of others as related to the quality or lack of quality in the self-publishing world can shake one’s confidence a bit. While there are certainly some valid complaints and criticisms published, it is possible they may originate with the individual making negative assertions in part or in whole, and not the publisher at all. With all the books that are self-published these days, one would expect more complaints and criticisms than there are. Work honestly through the process, have realistic expectations of how much support you will actually receive, put in the effort required to edit your work and one should achieve a reasonably good published end product.

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